EMPOWER WOMENS CONFRENCE

Make plans to join us for this year’s Empower Women’s Conference. Come and experience the dynamic ministry of Kelli Sanders and the transforming presence of the Lord on March 17, 18 & 19. “The Lord will perfect that which concerns me” Psalms 138:8

BUT IN THE MEAN TIME PLEASE COME AND WORSHIP WITH HARVEST TIME BECAUSE PEOPLE MATTER “AND YES YOU MATTER”

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THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT JOURNEY

 

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THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT WILL BE IN PEABODY AND LYNN MASS FOR 7 DAYS WILL BE BROADCASTING LIVE ALL 7 DAY ON OUR WEBSITE ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS

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DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT HAD TO CUT THE JOURNEY SHORT TO 4 DAYS INSTEAD OF 7 WE ARE SORRY WE COULDNT CONTINUE

GRACE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

 

Join us for Grace Leadership Conference 2017. We are expecting a fresh Word from God and an outpouring of the Holy Spirit. This year our special guests will be Jeremy and Sarah Pearsons and Phillip Baker. February 17th-19th.

 

 

we will see you all in 2018 but in the mean time please come and worship with harvest time because people matter “AND YES YOU MATTER”

DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS CONVERSATION

 WE ARE STARTING A CONVERSATION ON A FEW TOPICS DONALD TRUMP AND THE LYNN CITY COUNCIL SO USE THE LINKS BELOW AND WE WILL HAVE A DISCUSSION ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS USE THE LINKS BELOW TO HAVE A CONVERSATION

 

 

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Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy and School Superintendent Dr. Catherine Latham sat mere feet away from LaPierre as he directed these words to city attorney James Lamanna:

 

“There has been a rumor going around that somehow, some way, if you pass a bond of this nature, that the mayor or superintendent benefit monetarily (from) a bond like this. That is what people are asking. Does anyone in the city benefit from this bond being passed?”

 

In reply, Lamanna said Lynn students will benefit from the bond’s passage. “No salary increase will occur as a result of this bond.”

 

Reached by phone on Thursday, LaPierre said he subsequently apologized to Kennedy and Latham for his question. When asked to explain his “People are asking” remark, the councilor said three people brought the question to his attention. “I do regret asking it. I’m trying to close the books on it,” he said.

 

LaPierre probably could have asked a dozen probing and pertinent questions about the middle school project during Tuesday’s meeting. But the one that made the final cut for his choice of questions sounded like long-dead Joe McCarthy could have written it himself.

 

LaPierre is an educated and popular man capable of summarizing his position on issues and stating that position clearly. So why did he sling mud in the direction of two people who have all but staked their reputations on the construction of new middle schools?

 

Is there any reasonable-minded person, including Brian LaPierre, who thinks even for a minute that Judy Kennedy and Cathie Latham would approach their fellow Lynn residents with a tax-increase proposal that included a boost in their salaries?

 

Kennedy’s political future rests in part on how voters view the debt exclusion question. Latham is the architect and prime mover of the plan to get Marshall Middle School built. Her effort to repeat that success on behalf of Lynn’s students and future generations of students did not deserve to be tainted by LaPierre’s tawdry questioning.

 

Brian LaPierre is certainly aware of how much money Kennedy and the superintendent earn. Yet he publicly posed a question on Tuesday that sounded like, “Have you stopped beating your wife yet?”

 

LaPierre made sure Lamanna and anyone else listening knew he had researched the City Charter in an attempt to answer his own question. That statement was, at best, a clumsy effort by LaPierre to distance himself from the question. The notion that LaPierre — a man skilled in reading detailed labor contracts — does not have a working knowledge — if not a detailed knowledge — of the charter is preposterous.

 

LaPierre did himself a disservice as an elected city official and as a Lynn resident with his brief but pointed interrogation on Tuesday. In addition to the mayor and the superintendent, he also owes city residents an apology and, assuming he is running for reelection, he will have to wait until the fall to find out if they accept it.

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday, taking the helm of a deeply divided nation and putting Republicans in control of the White House for the first time in eight years.

The billionaire businessman and former reality television star has pledged an era of profound change, energizing his supporters with promises to wipe away predecessor Barack Obama’s signature achievements and to restore America to a lost position of strength. But Trump’s call for restrictive immigration measures and his caustic campaign rhetoric about women and minorities have infuriated other millions of Americans. He assumes office as one of the most unpopular incoming presidents in modern history.

The pomp and pageantry of the inaugural celebrations were also shadowed by questions about Trump’s ties to Russia, which U.S. intelligence agencies have determined worked to tip the 2016 election to help the Republican win.

Trump’s inauguration drew crowds to the nation’s capital to witness the history. It repelled others. More than 60 House Democrats refused to attend his swearing in ceremony in the shadow of the Capitol dome. One Democrat who did sit among the dignitaries was Hillary Clinton, Trump’s vanquished campaign rival who was widely expected by both parties to be the one taking the oath of office.

Instead, it was Trump placing his hand on two Bibles, one used by his family and another used for President Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration. At 70, Trump is the oldest person to be sworn in as president, marking a generational step backward after two terms for Obama, one of the youngest presidents to serve as commander in chief.

Trump takes charge of an economy that has recovered from the Great Recession but has nonetheless left millions of Americans feeling left behind. The nation’s longest war is still being waged in Afghanistan and U.S. troops are battling the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. The American health care system was expanded to reach millions more Americans during Obama’s tenure, but at considerable financial costs. Trump has vowed to dismantle and rebuild it.

Trump faces such challenges as the first president to take office without ever having held a political position or served in the military. He has stacked his Cabinet with established Washington figures and wealthy business leaders. Though his team’s conservative bent has been cheered by many Republicans, the overwhelmingly white and male Cabinet has been criticized for a lack of diversity.

Officials expected hundreds of thousands of people to flock to the National Mall to witness the inauguration of the 45th president, though early crowds appeared smaller than past celebrations. Demonstrations unfolded at various security checkpoints near the Capitol as police in riot gear helped ticket-holders get through to the ceremony.

In a show of solidarity, all of the living American presidents attended the swearing-in ceremony, except for 92-year-old George H.W. Bush, who was hospitalized this week with pneumonia. His wife, Barbara, was also admitted to the hospital after falling ill.

While Trump came to power bucking convention, he wrapped himself in the traditions that accompany the peaceful transfer of power. Following a morning church service with his family, Trump and his wife, Melania, had tea at the White House with Obama and outgoing first lady Michelle Obama.

The two couples greeted each other with handshakes and hugs, and Mrs. Trump presented Mrs. Obama with a gift. Following their private gathering in the executive mansion, the Trumps and Obamas traveled together to the Capitol for the swearing in ceremony.

 

Nancy Gilberg, Salem: “Horrified, disgusted, and very fearful for the safety of our planet.”

 

Susan Inserra, Saugus: “Instead of picking him apart for every blasted thing, would you please give the guy a chance?”

 

Ron Bogan, Danvers: “Very optimistic.”

 

Karen Conduragis, Norton: “I made a voting mistake, but honestly, could not vote for Clinton either. Just disgusted all around.”

 

Chris Baione, Beaumont, TX: “Definitely willing to give him a chance. Just think of the alternative. Never in a million years, Hi-lie-ary.”

 

Jennifer Pires, Lynn: “So disappointed that this great country would elect such a horrible person.”

 

Linda Burns, Reading: “Nothing we can do about it. We just have to hope it’ll be better than expected. I’m not going to add more stress to an already stress-filled life.”

 

Ann Desrosiers O’Brien, Lynn: “Excited to see some change. Welfare reform and better veterans affairs.”

 

Kirt Bonnevie, Lynn: “Well I was willing to give him a chance until I saw his picks for his incoming Cabinet. He has lied to and is still lying to the ignorant working class that voted him in.”

 

Mark Ierardi, Lynn: “Hopeful.”

 

Carol Alfonso MacDonald, Raymond, NH: “Wonder how he fooled so many people…”

 

Bukia Chalvire, Peabody: “I feel great.”

 

Sue Lane, Lynn: He deserves a chance just like ignorant Obama got.”

 

James Nalesnik, Lynn: Well he was voted in, so honestly I haven’t thought much about it. It’s not like the world is going to end.”

 

Susan Marrin, Lynn: “Love it.”

 

Donelda Millar, Saugus: “It’s a joke.”

 

Jay Curry, Newburyport: “Giving him a chance.”

 

DeLeon Mariugenia, Lynn: “I don’t feel thrilled or excited. I hope for him to be a good president. And you never know, sometimes people can look mean and it’s the other way around. He could be a good person after all.”

 

Kurt Anderson, Peabody: “Ask me in a couple of years. He isn’t even in office yet.”

DONALD J TRUMP

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YESTERDAY’S HEADLINES: The moment Donald Trump swears the oath of office and lifts his hand from the Bible as the 45th president of the United States on Friday, the clock begins on his first 100 days.

 

And within hours, the man who campaigned as an outsider vowing to shake up Washington will have his chance to start rolling back his predecessor’s legacy while forging his own.

 

The president-elect is set to take the oath shortly before noon, after spending Thursday meeting with supporters and getting his team in place. Incoming White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer would not give specific details about the extent and timing of Trump’s promised actions to turn back some of President Obama’s policies — but he promised a “robust” start.

 

“Make no mistake, we’re ready to go on Day One,” he said Thursday. Spicer said earlier that Trump has a “few” executive actions, “probably in the area of four to five, that we’re looking at on Friday.”

 

From there, Trump will be under pressure to begin working on his 100 days bucket list, which he detailed in a speech delivered in Gettysburg, Pa., last October.

 

Trump’s “Contract with the American Voter” outlines his plans for the “kind of change that only arrives once in a lifetime” — including 18 major action items. Based on that contract, here’s some of the more significant changes the 45th president could have in store for America:

 

Health Care Trump wants to “fully” repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it — with what, is not yet entirely clear. His campaign plan called for using “Health Savings Accounts,” and allowing insurance to be bought across state lines. Trump says he’s still working out the details and will soon have a new proposal, which based on recent interviews also could include taking on the pharmaceutical industry.

 

LETS HAVE A CONVERSATION

THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT WEBSITE IS BACK AND DONT BE SHY TO KEEP ON BLOGGING WITH US AS WELL THIS BLOG IS NOT GOING ANYWHERE DONT BE SHY TO TELL US ANYTHING YOU WANT TO TELL US WHAT YOU WANT US TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT TELL US YOUR LIFE EXPERIENCES AND LIFE IN GENERAL LIFE ISNT JUST FACEBOOK LETS HAVE A CONVERSATION WWW.DEMETRIOSKRITIKOS.COM/CONVERSATION

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POLICE LOG: 1-5-2017

January 4, 2017

All address information, particularly arrests, reflect police records. In the event of a perceived inaccuracy, it is the sole responsibility of the concerned party to contact the relevant police department and have the department issue a notice of correction to The Daily Item. Corrections or clarifications will not be made without express notice of change from the arresting police department.

LYNN

Arrests

Jorge Aurich, of 33 Spring St., was arrested on warrant charges of three counts of larceny and breaking and entering nighttime for a felony at 2:59 p.m. Tuesday.

Craig Ernst, 46, of 555 Summer St., was arrested and charged with Class B drug possession and disorderly conduct at 2:20 p.m. Wednesday.

Paige MacDonald, 26, of 66 Charles St., Quincy, was arrested on warrant charges of OUI drugs, operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, Class A drug possession and Class B drug possession at 11:56 a.m. Wednesday.

Tiffany Miller, of 28 Wickford St., Saugus, was arrested on a warrant at 2:56 p.m. Tuesday.

Corey O’Leary, 35, of 68 South St., was arrested and charged with Class C drug possession at 11:41 a.m. Wednesday.

James Perry, of 16 County Road, Chelsea, was arrested on warrant charges of four counts of larceny, operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, unregistered motor vehicle, obstructing firefighting and vandalizing a state building at 4 p.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 4:19 p.m. Tuesday at Joyce and Union streets; at 7:14 p.m. Tuesday at Franklin and Hanover streets.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 4:47 p.m. Tuesday at Boston and Franklin streets; at 4:58 p.m. Tuesday at O’Callaghan Way and Walnut Street; at 9:35 p.m. Tuesday at 41 Laighton St.; at 7:51 a.m. Wednesday at 19 Union St.; at 8:48 a.m. Wednesday at 901 Western Ave.; at 10:35 a.m. Wednesday at McDonalds at 567 Lynnway; at 2:04 p.m. Wednesday at 70 Lafayette Park.

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 9:50 p.m. Tuesday at 53 Union St.; at 10:06 p.m. Tuesday at Broadway and Springvale Avenue.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 3:16 a.m. Wednesday on Central Avenue.

A report of an assault and battery at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday on Chestnut Street.

A report of a sexual assault at 10:21 a.m. Wednesday on Brookline Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 2:09 p.m. Tuesday at 5 Albany Terrace; at 7:40 p.m. Tuesday at 171 Lewis St.; at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at 8 Ridge Ave.; at 10:39 p.m. Tuesday at 25 Hamilton Ave.; at 12:07 a.m. Wednesday at 39 Coburn St.; at 1:01 a.m. Wednesday at 25 Hamilton Ave.; at 1:19 a.m. Wednesday at 100 Newhall St.; at 1:39 a.m. Wednesday at 8 Lafayette Park.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 3:14 p.m. Tuesday on Union Street; at 3:23 p.m. Tuesday at 50 Boston St.

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism at 6:59 a.m. Wednesday at 8 Wilfred St.; at 1:06 p.m. Wednesday at 25 Bessom St.


MARBLEHEAD

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 11:13 a.m. Tuesday on Cornell Road. A caller reported broken glass outside a church and believes someone may have broken in. Police reported broken glass and signs of a break-in.

Complaints

A woman reported she was extremely upset about an encounter with a rude parking lot attendant at 9:54 a.m. Tuesday on Bessom Street. She told police she knew she shouldn’t have parked in the private lot, but was upset that nothing was going to be done about the incident.


PEABODY

Arrests

Joseph J. Lafratta, 44, of 13 Rose Circle, was arrested and charged with Class A drug possession and on a warrant at 8:01 p.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 2:09 p.m. Tuesday at 54 Walnut St. and 2 Upton St.; at 3:15 p.m. Tuesday at 48 Lynnfield St. and 2 Cashman Road; at 5:03 p.m. Tuesday at Holden Oil at 91 Lynnfield St.; at 6:59 p.m. Tuesday at Latitude Sports Club at 194 Newbury St. A caller reported a single motor vehicle into a fire hydrant; at 7:05 a.m. Wednesday at Bartholomew Street and 230 Valley Circle; at 9:49 a.m. Wednesday at Luso American Credit Union at 37 Tremont St. One person was taken to Salem Hospital.

A report of a motor vehicle accident with personal injury at 8:01 p.m. Tuesday at Dunkin’ Donuts at 2 Swampscott Ave. A three car accident was reported. Joseph J. Lafratta, 44, of Peabody was arrested; at 8:31 p.m. Tuesday at Walgreens at 229 Andover St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering at 1:35 p.m. Tuesday at Turkish Towel at 34 Railroad Ave. A caller reported the supply trailer lock was cut by an apparent bolt cutter.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday at Friendly’s Restaurant at 250 Andover St.; at 12:08 a.m. Wednesday at 34 Keys Drive; at 3:19 a.m. Wednesday at 14 Tuckers Court.

A caller reported an unknown person was knocking on her back door maliciously at 10:56 p.m. Tuesday at Mobile Estates at 286 Newbury St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 3:15 p.m. Tuesday at Bank of America ATM at 150 Main St. A caller reported finding several ATM cards. She thought the ATM may have been vandalized or possibly broken into. Police reported the machine had been damaged.


REVERE

Arrests

Luana L. Cepeda, 23, of 308 Reservoir Ave., Apt. 2, was arrested on warrants at 7:05 a.m. Tuesday.

Dennis Leonel Ramirez, 24, of 35 Louis St., Apt. B1, Chelsea, was arrested and charged with four counts of Class B drug distribution, three counts of Class A drug distribution and possession of a Class B drug with intent to distribute at 1:21 p.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 6 a.m. Tuesday on Copeland Circle; at 12:21 p.m. Tuesday at Harris and Beach streets; at 2:51 p.m. Tuesday at Showcase Cinemas on Squire Road; at 4:09 p.m. Tuesday at Stop & Shop on Squire Road; at 4:58 p.m. Tuesday at Broadway Towers on Broadway; at 10:05 p.m. Tuesday on Copeland Circle. Marlucio Alves-Dos Santos, 38, of 60 Temple St., Reading, was summoned for unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 1:10 p.m. Tuesday on Charger Street; at 2:43 p.m. Tuesday on Foster Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny/forgery/fraud at 11:40 a.m. Tuesday on Fenno Street; at 2:27 p.m. Tuesday at Casa Lucia on Lucia Avenue.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 8:28 p.m. Tuesday at Winthrop Avenue Laundry on Winthrop Avenue.


SAUGUS

Arrests

Charlotte L. Levasseur, of 139 Franklin St., Apt. 1, Stoneham, was arrested on warrants at 3:31 a.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle hit and run accident at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Tedeschi at 386 Lincoln Ave.

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 4:36 p.m. Tuesday at Marshalls at 655 Broadway; at 7:07 a.m. Wednesday on Walnut Street.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 5 a.m. Tuesday at Red Roof Inn at 920 Broadway.


SWAMPSCOTT

Arrests

Carlos Beltran, 39, of 126 Garfield Ave., Chelsea, was arrested and charged with strangulation or suffocation, assault and battery and on warrant charges of inhaling glue/toxic substance, operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, leaving the scene of property damage, negligent operation of a motor vehicle and OUI drugs at 3:23 a.m. Saturday.

Jorje Gomez-Perez, 28, of 23 Court St., Lynn, was arrested and charged with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended license, operation of a motor vehicle with a revoked registration, uninsured motor vehicle/trailer, unregistered motor vehicle and improper operation of a motor vehicle at 5:25 p.m. Saturday.

Jessica Sindo, 28, of 148 Liberty St., Lynn, was arrested and charged with assault and battery on a police officer, assault with a dangerous weapon, destruction of property, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and OUI liquor second offense at 7:50 a.m. Saturday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle accident at 4:09 p.m. Tuesday at Essex and Hanley streets.

Assaults

A report of a sexual assault at 2:55 p.m. Tuesday on Humphrey Street.

A report of an assault and battery at 3:12 p.m. Tuesday on Paradise Road.

PEABODY AND LYNNFIELD REPS SET 2017 GOALS

 

PEABODY AND LYNNFIELD REPS SET 2017 GOALS

January 5, 2017

ITEM FILE PHOTO
Thomas Walsh celebrates his victory in the Peabody special election in this March 2016 file photo.

By LEAH DEARBORN

PEABODY — Fresh from being sworn in to new terms, state Rep. Thomas Walsh (D-Peabody) and state Rep. Bradley H. Jones Jr. (R-Reading) said they are opening their offices to constituents to hear their views and ideas.

Walsh’s first open office of the year at the Torigian Family Health Center will be Jan. 13 from 9-10 a.m.

“I’m very pleased to be sworn into a full two-year term,” said Walsh, who was sworn in at the State House Jan. 4. “It’s been a very interesting several months.”

Walsh won the 12th Essex representative seat last spring that had been vacated in September of 2015 by Leah Cole.

Jones, who was also reelected for an eighth term as minority leader of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, said residents of Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading and Middleton tend to visit his office for two sets of reasons.

“They might want to talk about an idea they have for legislation. The other side is people having a particular problem,” said Jones. “It goes from policy to personal.”

Constituents can also arrange for individual appointments and he called every coffee shop in the area his office. Jones’ office hours will be the second Friday of every month at Lynnfield Town Hall from 9-10 a.m., beginning Jan. 13.

Walsh said one of his newest initiatives is a collective effort through city government and state Sen. Joan Lovely to conduct a study exploring the use of existing rail lines to run a trolley to the Salem MBTA Station.

“I see it as an economic development tool,” said Walsh. “It’s something we would like to pursue.”

Walsh said the initiative is still in the preliminary stages and that the first step is to secure funding to hire a consultant.

“I think it’s the future,” said Walsh. He added that Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt Jr. and city council have done a very effective job rejuvenating the downtown, but that there are still vacancies in a number of buildings.

Additional transportation options will help fill those vacancies and bring more young professionals into the city, he said.

Walsh was elected to city council in 2015 for a two-year term as well, which he plans to complete. He said he will not seek reelection to the council when that term is up.

LYNNFIELD REPS SET 2017 GOALS

January 5, 2017

ITEM FILE PHOTO
Thomas Walsh celebrates his victory in the Peabody special election in this March 2016 file photo.

By LEAH DEARBORN

PEABODY — Fresh from being sworn in to new terms, state Rep. Thomas Walsh (D-Peabody) and state Rep. Bradley H. Jones Jr. (R-Reading) said they are opening their offices to constituents to hear their views and ideas.

Walsh’s first open office of the year at the Torigian Family Health Center will be Jan. 13 from 9-10 a.m.

“I’m very pleased to be sworn into a full two-year term,” said Walsh, who was sworn in at the State House Jan. 4. “It’s been a very interesting several months.”

Walsh won the 12th Essex representative seat last spring that had been vacated in September of 2015 by Leah Cole.

Jones, who was also reelected for an eighth term as minority leader of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, said residents of Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading and Middleton tend to visit his office for two sets of reasons.

“They might want to talk about an idea they have for legislation. The other side is people having a particular problem,” said Jones. “It goes from policy to personal.”

Constituents can also arrange for individual appointments and he called every coffee shop in the area his office. Jones’ office hours will be the second Friday of every month at Lynnfield Town Hall from 9-10 a.m., beginning Jan. 13.

Walsh said one of his newest initiatives is a collective effort through city government and state Sen. Joan Lovely to conduct a study exploring the use of existing rail lines to run a trolley to the Salem MBTA Station.

“I see it as an economic development tool,” said Walsh. “It’s something we would like to pursue.”

Walsh said the initiative is still in the preliminary stages and that the first step is to secure funding to hire a consultant.

“I think it’s the future,” said Walsh. He added that Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt Jr. and city council have done a very effective job rejuvenating the downtown, but that there are still vacancies in a number of buildings.

Additional transportation options will help fill those vacancies and bring more young professionals into the city, he said.

Walsh was elected to city council in 2015 for a two-year term as well, which he plans to complete. He said he will not seek reelection to the council when that term is up.

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