DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS CONVERSATION

 WE ARE STARTING A CONVERSATION ON A FEW TOPICS DONALD TRUMP AND THE LYNN CITY COUNCIL SO USE THE LINKS BELOW AND WE WILL HAVE A DISCUSSION ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS USE THE LINKS BELOW TO HAVE A CONVERSATION

 

 

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Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy and School Superintendent Dr. Catherine Latham sat mere feet away from LaPierre as he directed these words to city attorney James Lamanna:

 

“There has been a rumor going around that somehow, some way, if you pass a bond of this nature, that the mayor or superintendent benefit monetarily (from) a bond like this. That is what people are asking. Does anyone in the city benefit from this bond being passed?”

 

In reply, Lamanna said Lynn students will benefit from the bond’s passage. “No salary increase will occur as a result of this bond.”

 

Reached by phone on Thursday, LaPierre said he subsequently apologized to Kennedy and Latham for his question. When asked to explain his “People are asking” remark, the councilor said three people brought the question to his attention. “I do regret asking it. I’m trying to close the books on it,” he said.

 

LaPierre probably could have asked a dozen probing and pertinent questions about the middle school project during Tuesday’s meeting. But the one that made the final cut for his choice of questions sounded like long-dead Joe McCarthy could have written it himself.

 

LaPierre is an educated and popular man capable of summarizing his position on issues and stating that position clearly. So why did he sling mud in the direction of two people who have all but staked their reputations on the construction of new middle schools?

 

Is there any reasonable-minded person, including Brian LaPierre, who thinks even for a minute that Judy Kennedy and Cathie Latham would approach their fellow Lynn residents with a tax-increase proposal that included a boost in their salaries?

 

Kennedy’s political future rests in part on how voters view the debt exclusion question. Latham is the architect and prime mover of the plan to get Marshall Middle School built. Her effort to repeat that success on behalf of Lynn’s students and future generations of students did not deserve to be tainted by LaPierre’s tawdry questioning.

 

Brian LaPierre is certainly aware of how much money Kennedy and the superintendent earn. Yet he publicly posed a question on Tuesday that sounded like, “Have you stopped beating your wife yet?”

 

LaPierre made sure Lamanna and anyone else listening knew he had researched the City Charter in an attempt to answer his own question. That statement was, at best, a clumsy effort by LaPierre to distance himself from the question. The notion that LaPierre — a man skilled in reading detailed labor contracts — does not have a working knowledge — if not a detailed knowledge — of the charter is preposterous.

 

LaPierre did himself a disservice as an elected city official and as a Lynn resident with his brief but pointed interrogation on Tuesday. In addition to the mayor and the superintendent, he also owes city residents an apology and, assuming he is running for reelection, he will have to wait until the fall to find out if they accept it.

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday, taking the helm of a deeply divided nation and putting Republicans in control of the White House for the first time in eight years.

The billionaire businessman and former reality television star has pledged an era of profound change, energizing his supporters with promises to wipe away predecessor Barack Obama’s signature achievements and to restore America to a lost position of strength. But Trump’s call for restrictive immigration measures and his caustic campaign rhetoric about women and minorities have infuriated other millions of Americans. He assumes office as one of the most unpopular incoming presidents in modern history.

The pomp and pageantry of the inaugural celebrations were also shadowed by questions about Trump’s ties to Russia, which U.S. intelligence agencies have determined worked to tip the 2016 election to help the Republican win.

Trump’s inauguration drew crowds to the nation’s capital to witness the history. It repelled others. More than 60 House Democrats refused to attend his swearing in ceremony in the shadow of the Capitol dome. One Democrat who did sit among the dignitaries was Hillary Clinton, Trump’s vanquished campaign rival who was widely expected by both parties to be the one taking the oath of office.

Instead, it was Trump placing his hand on two Bibles, one used by his family and another used for President Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration. At 70, Trump is the oldest person to be sworn in as president, marking a generational step backward after two terms for Obama, one of the youngest presidents to serve as commander in chief.

Trump takes charge of an economy that has recovered from the Great Recession but has nonetheless left millions of Americans feeling left behind. The nation’s longest war is still being waged in Afghanistan and U.S. troops are battling the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. The American health care system was expanded to reach millions more Americans during Obama’s tenure, but at considerable financial costs. Trump has vowed to dismantle and rebuild it.

Trump faces such challenges as the first president to take office without ever having held a political position or served in the military. He has stacked his Cabinet with established Washington figures and wealthy business leaders. Though his team’s conservative bent has been cheered by many Republicans, the overwhelmingly white and male Cabinet has been criticized for a lack of diversity.

Officials expected hundreds of thousands of people to flock to the National Mall to witness the inauguration of the 45th president, though early crowds appeared smaller than past celebrations. Demonstrations unfolded at various security checkpoints near the Capitol as police in riot gear helped ticket-holders get through to the ceremony.

In a show of solidarity, all of the living American presidents attended the swearing-in ceremony, except for 92-year-old George H.W. Bush, who was hospitalized this week with pneumonia. His wife, Barbara, was also admitted to the hospital after falling ill.

While Trump came to power bucking convention, he wrapped himself in the traditions that accompany the peaceful transfer of power. Following a morning church service with his family, Trump and his wife, Melania, had tea at the White House with Obama and outgoing first lady Michelle Obama.

The two couples greeted each other with handshakes and hugs, and Mrs. Trump presented Mrs. Obama with a gift. Following their private gathering in the executive mansion, the Trumps and Obamas traveled together to the Capitol for the swearing in ceremony.

 

Nancy Gilberg, Salem: “Horrified, disgusted, and very fearful for the safety of our planet.”

 

Susan Inserra, Saugus: “Instead of picking him apart for every blasted thing, would you please give the guy a chance?”

 

Ron Bogan, Danvers: “Very optimistic.”

 

Karen Conduragis, Norton: “I made a voting mistake, but honestly, could not vote for Clinton either. Just disgusted all around.”

 

Chris Baione, Beaumont, TX: “Definitely willing to give him a chance. Just think of the alternative. Never in a million years, Hi-lie-ary.”

 

Jennifer Pires, Lynn: “So disappointed that this great country would elect such a horrible person.”

 

Linda Burns, Reading: “Nothing we can do about it. We just have to hope it’ll be better than expected. I’m not going to add more stress to an already stress-filled life.”

 

Ann Desrosiers O’Brien, Lynn: “Excited to see some change. Welfare reform and better veterans affairs.”

 

Kirt Bonnevie, Lynn: “Well I was willing to give him a chance until I saw his picks for his incoming Cabinet. He has lied to and is still lying to the ignorant working class that voted him in.”

 

Mark Ierardi, Lynn: “Hopeful.”

 

Carol Alfonso MacDonald, Raymond, NH: “Wonder how he fooled so many people…”

 

Bukia Chalvire, Peabody: “I feel great.”

 

Sue Lane, Lynn: He deserves a chance just like ignorant Obama got.”

 

James Nalesnik, Lynn: Well he was voted in, so honestly I haven’t thought much about it. It’s not like the world is going to end.”

 

Susan Marrin, Lynn: “Love it.”

 

Donelda Millar, Saugus: “It’s a joke.”

 

Jay Curry, Newburyport: “Giving him a chance.”

 

DeLeon Mariugenia, Lynn: “I don’t feel thrilled or excited. I hope for him to be a good president. And you never know, sometimes people can look mean and it’s the other way around. He could be a good person after all.”

 

Kurt Anderson, Peabody: “Ask me in a couple of years. He isn’t even in office yet.”

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