All posts by dkritikos

As of December 26th the demetrios kritikos entertainment HD will go through some changes in our look and our music. Yes we are going to be really good and more vibrant and yes we will be on our HD channels on radio and our website will also have a brand new look also but for now go to www.demetrioskritikos.com/blogs or on twitter at @dk01902 #newmusic or #specialday thanks for making us ur number1 on the dial and yes we will still play Christmas music every year THANK YOU VERY MUCH Demetrios Kritikos CHAIRMAN AND CEO DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT

THE WALK FOR HUNGER 5 K RUN 2017

Project Bread – The Walk for Hunger

Project Bread is an antihunger organization creating and promoting programs to help end hunger in Massachusetts. With the Chefs in Schools Initiative, the organization is changing school food. The Initiative is a joint effort with Project Bread and the City of Boston to change what kids eat in the school cafeteria. First piloted in the Boston Public Schools, the “Chef in Resident,” Chef Kirk Conrad, is now working in Lawrence and Salem School districts.[1][2]

The Child Nutrition Outreach Program at Project Bread has partnered with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to promote participation the Summer Food Service Program and the National School Breakfast Program, both federally funded programs. Making sure kids don’t go hungry when they’re not in school, sites around the state allow low-income children the opportunity for free or reduced priced meals.[3][4]

According to Project Bread’s 2010 status report, 660,000 people in Massachusetts are hungry.[5] Project Bread is trying to eliminate the number of food insecure people with the FoodSource Hotline, where people can find out how to get the help they need.[6] Project Bread has also created an easy website to help residents apply for food stamps.[7][8]

Boston Red Sox player Jacoby Ellsbury came out with “ZinfandEllsbury” Wine in 2010, with proceeds benefitting Project Bread.[9]

History

The logo of the 2009 Walk for Hunger

The first Walk was held in 1969 by a group of activists from the Paulist Center, led by Patrick Hughes. An estimated 2,000 people walked and raised $26,000 to help fund two hunger projects. At the 2009 Walk for Hunger, 44,000 people came to the Boston Common to raise millions for the hungry. The 20-mile pledge Walk attracted over 1,000 religious organizations, as well as 1,200 corporate teams, 1,200 schools, 2,000 volunteers, and 700 friends and family groups who all came together to help feed hungry people in Massachusetts.[10]

The 20-mile Walk occurs annually on the first Sunday in May and weaves through BostonBrooklineNewtonWatertown and Cambridge, and includes entertainment and free snacks along the way. The 45th annual Walk for Hunger took place on Sunday, May 5, 2013.[11] In 2016 the course was shortened from 20 miles to 10 due to cost and security concerns. [12]

Heart & Sole Walkers and Volunteers

Unlike regular Walkers, The Heart & Sole Walkers must raise at least $500 to become part of the Heart & Sole Circle. The group raises more than $1 million to help hungry people annually. These special Walkers are between the ages of 9 and 90. Their help is what makes it possible to raise one third of the money given to help the hungry. Special T-shirts are given to these individuals.

Volunteers at the Walk help assist Walkers. At each checkpoint, volunteers help check off mile sheets, hand out cold water, assist Walkers by helping them cross the streets safely and motivating the participants.[13]

ALL STATE FUNDING FOR CHEFS IN SCHOOLS WAS JUST CUT— HALF WAY THROUGH THE SCHOOL YEAR. HELP US STAY IN 103 LOW-INCOME SCHOOLS!

 

Thank you to our sponsors!

Webster Bank · Samuel Financial · MassGeneral Hospital for Children · Whole Foods Market · Brookline Bank · Odysseys Unlimited ·
Regenie’s All Natural Snacks · Effie’s Homemade · SHAKE SHACK · Nola’s Fresh Foods · Nashoba Brook Bakery · Polar Beverages · Zipcar · DRINKmaple · Bai Brands · WBUR · Boston Medical Center · SpotHero

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THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT JOURNEY

 

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THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT WILL BE IN PEABODY AND LYNN MASS FOR 7 DAYS WILL BE BROADCASTING LIVE ALL 7 DAY ON OUR WEBSITE ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS

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DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER THE DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS ENTERTAINMENT HAD TO CUT THE JOURNEY SHORT TO 4 DAYS INSTEAD OF 7 WE ARE SORRY WE COULDNT CONTINUE

GRACE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

 

Join us for Grace Leadership Conference 2017. We are expecting a fresh Word from God and an outpouring of the Holy Spirit. This year our special guests will be Jeremy and Sarah Pearsons and Phillip Baker. February 17th-19th.

 

 

we will see you all in 2018 but in the mean time please come and worship with harvest time because people matter “AND YES YOU MATTER”

DEMETRIOS KRITIKOS CONVERSATION

 WE ARE STARTING A CONVERSATION ON A FEW TOPICS DONALD TRUMP AND THE LYNN CITY COUNCIL SO USE THE LINKS BELOW AND WE WILL HAVE A DISCUSSION ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS USE THE LINKS BELOW TO HAVE A CONVERSATION

 

 

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http://demetrioskritikos.com/conversation

 

Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy and School Superintendent Dr. Catherine Latham sat mere feet away from LaPierre as he directed these words to city attorney James Lamanna:

 

“There has been a rumor going around that somehow, some way, if you pass a bond of this nature, that the mayor or superintendent benefit monetarily (from) a bond like this. That is what people are asking. Does anyone in the city benefit from this bond being passed?”

 

In reply, Lamanna said Lynn students will benefit from the bond’s passage. “No salary increase will occur as a result of this bond.”

 

Reached by phone on Thursday, LaPierre said he subsequently apologized to Kennedy and Latham for his question. When asked to explain his “People are asking” remark, the councilor said three people brought the question to his attention. “I do regret asking it. I’m trying to close the books on it,” he said.

 

LaPierre probably could have asked a dozen probing and pertinent questions about the middle school project during Tuesday’s meeting. But the one that made the final cut for his choice of questions sounded like long-dead Joe McCarthy could have written it himself.

 

LaPierre is an educated and popular man capable of summarizing his position on issues and stating that position clearly. So why did he sling mud in the direction of two people who have all but staked their reputations on the construction of new middle schools?

 

Is there any reasonable-minded person, including Brian LaPierre, who thinks even for a minute that Judy Kennedy and Cathie Latham would approach their fellow Lynn residents with a tax-increase proposal that included a boost in their salaries?

 

Kennedy’s political future rests in part on how voters view the debt exclusion question. Latham is the architect and prime mover of the plan to get Marshall Middle School built. Her effort to repeat that success on behalf of Lynn’s students and future generations of students did not deserve to be tainted by LaPierre’s tawdry questioning.

 

Brian LaPierre is certainly aware of how much money Kennedy and the superintendent earn. Yet he publicly posed a question on Tuesday that sounded like, “Have you stopped beating your wife yet?”

 

LaPierre made sure Lamanna and anyone else listening knew he had researched the City Charter in an attempt to answer his own question. That statement was, at best, a clumsy effort by LaPierre to distance himself from the question. The notion that LaPierre — a man skilled in reading detailed labor contracts — does not have a working knowledge — if not a detailed knowledge — of the charter is preposterous.

 

LaPierre did himself a disservice as an elected city official and as a Lynn resident with his brief but pointed interrogation on Tuesday. In addition to the mayor and the superintendent, he also owes city residents an apology and, assuming he is running for reelection, he will have to wait until the fall to find out if they accept it.

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday, taking the helm of a deeply divided nation and putting Republicans in control of the White House for the first time in eight years.

The billionaire businessman and former reality television star has pledged an era of profound change, energizing his supporters with promises to wipe away predecessor Barack Obama’s signature achievements and to restore America to a lost position of strength. But Trump’s call for restrictive immigration measures and his caustic campaign rhetoric about women and minorities have infuriated other millions of Americans. He assumes office as one of the most unpopular incoming presidents in modern history.

The pomp and pageantry of the inaugural celebrations were also shadowed by questions about Trump’s ties to Russia, which U.S. intelligence agencies have determined worked to tip the 2016 election to help the Republican win.

Trump’s inauguration drew crowds to the nation’s capital to witness the history. It repelled others. More than 60 House Democrats refused to attend his swearing in ceremony in the shadow of the Capitol dome. One Democrat who did sit among the dignitaries was Hillary Clinton, Trump’s vanquished campaign rival who was widely expected by both parties to be the one taking the oath of office.

Instead, it was Trump placing his hand on two Bibles, one used by his family and another used for President Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration. At 70, Trump is the oldest person to be sworn in as president, marking a generational step backward after two terms for Obama, one of the youngest presidents to serve as commander in chief.

Trump takes charge of an economy that has recovered from the Great Recession but has nonetheless left millions of Americans feeling left behind. The nation’s longest war is still being waged in Afghanistan and U.S. troops are battling the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. The American health care system was expanded to reach millions more Americans during Obama’s tenure, but at considerable financial costs. Trump has vowed to dismantle and rebuild it.

Trump faces such challenges as the first president to take office without ever having held a political position or served in the military. He has stacked his Cabinet with established Washington figures and wealthy business leaders. Though his team’s conservative bent has been cheered by many Republicans, the overwhelmingly white and male Cabinet has been criticized for a lack of diversity.

Officials expected hundreds of thousands of people to flock to the National Mall to witness the inauguration of the 45th president, though early crowds appeared smaller than past celebrations. Demonstrations unfolded at various security checkpoints near the Capitol as police in riot gear helped ticket-holders get through to the ceremony.

In a show of solidarity, all of the living American presidents attended the swearing-in ceremony, except for 92-year-old George H.W. Bush, who was hospitalized this week with pneumonia. His wife, Barbara, was also admitted to the hospital after falling ill.

While Trump came to power bucking convention, he wrapped himself in the traditions that accompany the peaceful transfer of power. Following a morning church service with his family, Trump and his wife, Melania, had tea at the White House with Obama and outgoing first lady Michelle Obama.

The two couples greeted each other with handshakes and hugs, and Mrs. Trump presented Mrs. Obama with a gift. Following their private gathering in the executive mansion, the Trumps and Obamas traveled together to the Capitol for the swearing in ceremony.

 

Nancy Gilberg, Salem: “Horrified, disgusted, and very fearful for the safety of our planet.”

 

Susan Inserra, Saugus: “Instead of picking him apart for every blasted thing, would you please give the guy a chance?”

 

Ron Bogan, Danvers: “Very optimistic.”

 

Karen Conduragis, Norton: “I made a voting mistake, but honestly, could not vote for Clinton either. Just disgusted all around.”

 

Chris Baione, Beaumont, TX: “Definitely willing to give him a chance. Just think of the alternative. Never in a million years, Hi-lie-ary.”

 

Jennifer Pires, Lynn: “So disappointed that this great country would elect such a horrible person.”

 

Linda Burns, Reading: “Nothing we can do about it. We just have to hope it’ll be better than expected. I’m not going to add more stress to an already stress-filled life.”

 

Ann Desrosiers O’Brien, Lynn: “Excited to see some change. Welfare reform and better veterans affairs.”

 

Kirt Bonnevie, Lynn: “Well I was willing to give him a chance until I saw his picks for his incoming Cabinet. He has lied to and is still lying to the ignorant working class that voted him in.”

 

Mark Ierardi, Lynn: “Hopeful.”

 

Carol Alfonso MacDonald, Raymond, NH: “Wonder how he fooled so many people…”

 

Bukia Chalvire, Peabody: “I feel great.”

 

Sue Lane, Lynn: He deserves a chance just like ignorant Obama got.”

 

James Nalesnik, Lynn: Well he was voted in, so honestly I haven’t thought much about it. It’s not like the world is going to end.”

 

Susan Marrin, Lynn: “Love it.”

 

Donelda Millar, Saugus: “It’s a joke.”

 

Jay Curry, Newburyport: “Giving him a chance.”

 

DeLeon Mariugenia, Lynn: “I don’t feel thrilled or excited. I hope for him to be a good president. And you never know, sometimes people can look mean and it’s the other way around. He could be a good person after all.”

 

Kurt Anderson, Peabody: “Ask me in a couple of years. He isn’t even in office yet.”

DONALD J TRUMP

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YESTERDAY’S HEADLINES: The moment Donald Trump swears the oath of office and lifts his hand from the Bible as the 45th president of the United States on Friday, the clock begins on his first 100 days.

 

And within hours, the man who campaigned as an outsider vowing to shake up Washington will have his chance to start rolling back his predecessor’s legacy while forging his own.

 

The president-elect is set to take the oath shortly before noon, after spending Thursday meeting with supporters and getting his team in place. Incoming White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer would not give specific details about the extent and timing of Trump’s promised actions to turn back some of President Obama’s policies — but he promised a “robust” start.

 

“Make no mistake, we’re ready to go on Day One,” he said Thursday. Spicer said earlier that Trump has a “few” executive actions, “probably in the area of four to five, that we’re looking at on Friday.”

 

From there, Trump will be under pressure to begin working on his 100 days bucket list, which he detailed in a speech delivered in Gettysburg, Pa., last October.

 

Trump’s “Contract with the American Voter” outlines his plans for the “kind of change that only arrives once in a lifetime” — including 18 major action items. Based on that contract, here’s some of the more significant changes the 45th president could have in store for America:

 

Health Care Trump wants to “fully” repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it — with what, is not yet entirely clear. His campaign plan called for using “Health Savings Accounts,” and allowing insurance to be bought across state lines. Trump says he’s still working out the details and will soon have a new proposal, which based on recent interviews also could include taking on the pharmaceutical industry.